But Permata is not a gov’t agency in S Korea

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YOURSAY | ‘Unless Rosmah has something to hide, why can't Permata publish its audited yearly accounts.’

Quit as Permata patron if you can't handle scrutiny, Rosmah told

P Dev Anand Pillai: So much has been said about Permata and annually since the current prime minister came to power, a vast sum from the federal budget has been allotted to this agency, but I don't see any centres run by this so-called 'early childhood development experts'.

There are so many children with disabilities and other disorders. I am a father of a boy who is mentally challenged. So, if this programme is for children like my son, I would like to see it.

If Permata’s budget is from one's personal money, then we don't care. This is our hard-earned tax monies, where is this money going?

Anonymous 2436471476414726: Well said, Damansara Utama state representative Yeo Bee Yin. Permata cannot have such huge government allocations annually and yet not be accountable for it.

It is the rakyat's money so the public have every right to demand to know in detail how the monies are spent. This is not politicising the issue.

Unless PM’s wife Rosmah Mansor has something to hide, why can't Permata publish its audited yearly accounts.

CQ Muar: Spot on, DAP assemblyperson Yeo, for excoriating Rosmah about her role as patron of Permata.

In the first place, apart from being the wife of PM Najib Razak, what business has she to hold the post? Who is responsible for installing her? How much is she paid for the job? Is there no guideline pertaining to such a role?

If so, the matter should have been raised through the proper channels and have her removed. It appears as though the prime minister has the prerogative to put his wife anywhere he fancies.

Being the wife of the PM should not be the criteria for such responsibility rightfully held under certain ministry.

Anonymous #03815719: Yeo, thank you very much and you are absolutely right. Permata is funded through public funds, money obtained through taxes and it should properly and publicly be accounted for.

Being the PM's wife, she is not free from scrutiny. Or let the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) do the scrutiny on behalf of the public.

Anonymous_3ee4: Yes, Yeo is spot on. Let the experts handle it. Maybe the PM’s wife should look after the homeless and hungry, and lend a helping hand to the food programme run by the volunteers.

Headhunter: I'll be interested to know how much they spent on average on each kid a year. Needless to say, the sum will be another shocking revelation.

Lessons from South Korea

Kingfisher: Good on you, Sepang MP Mohamed Hanipah Maidin for identifying the problems facing this country - on corruption and abuse of power at the highest level - as compared to South Korea, where none other than the president has been successfully impeached for such a crime.

The root of our failure, it seems obvious in comparison, is the default in moral responsibility of the very chamber that you are an integral part and that is the House of Representatives.

The chamber, one can argue, could have acted in a concerted manner notwithstanding political differences to investigate and find a just solution to the allegations of a reckless disregard to managing public funds by elected officials.

The unwillingness and the inability of the chamber to act righteously on such a vital issue of national importance is a poor reflection of its members’ lack of appreciation of the general will of the people.

Never mind, the biases in electoral success to be MP.

Anonymous_1388029052: In countries where there is least corruption, the institutions are usually strong and independent - the courts, the police, the press, civil service, etc, and the leadership would also set an example.

However, sad to say, this do not happen in our country because our leaders are generally immoral and corrupt to the core, and yet able to get elected to office.

This is because they have managed to buy over the rural voters, the civil servants, and the Felda settlers using racial and religious card, unfair electoral means and abusing government machinery.

Awang Top: Corruption is a disease universal to all civilisations, not just Islamic. The fact is that Malaysia is helmed by people who endorse and practice corruption has made Malaysia a sick nation.

Corruption influences all aspects of our lives - judges, police, council, parliament, politicians, businesses, workers, even our children.

Our leaders do not have the political will to fight corruption, instead enjoy it - from husbands to wives, from wives to husbands, from fathers to sons.

Clever Voter: South Korea has a history of dictatorship, and endless problems of corruption and cronyism.

The introduction of parliamentary democracy and real efforts on strengthening the institutional governance resolved much of these problems.

Its president doesn't have the power to remove its judges, attorney-generals, etc. The economy is owned by few families but their SME (small and medium-size enterprise) sector is strong and extensive.

People participation in political affairs is high, and they have lower tolerance for corruption scandals, etc.

Compare these with BN government which chooses to build loyalty around fear, insecurity and paranoia. Not to forget, the use of religion, public jobs and handouts as sweeteners.

Spinning: It was the people’s power that brought down the South Korean president (Park Geun-hye). This also happened in Indonesia (Suharto) and the Philippines (Ferdinand Marcos)…


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