Yoursay: People power in Malaysia is a long way off

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YOURSAY | ‘We did mobilise protests. But the EC and BN do not care.’

The alternative is protest, people

Cogito Ergo Sum: While mobilising the people and taking to the streets is a great suggestion, writer Jason Wong forgets one thing: we are not a homogeneous society.

By design, we are divided racially, culturally and by religion. And religion has been used to the maximum to divide us. It will take generations to snap out of this ethnic divisive rut that we been pushed into.

Almost daily, the “us versus them” scenario is being drummed into the society by the media and politicians. Race and religion seem to be under threat by imagined hordes of infidels and barbarians who have immigrated to our shores.

This is the biggest hurdle to any unified effort and getting a street movement going. There are deep-rooted issues that are taboo in religion such as the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) issue, and this is one of the major stumbling blocks to unity.

People power in Malaysia, for the time being, is a long, long way off.

Quigonbond: Jason, you're a bit behind the times. We did mobilise protests. But the Election Commission (EC) and BN do not care.

And what makes you think supporting Bersatu as part of Pakatan Harapan’s coalition is destroying the Reformasi idealism?

The assumption that acceptance of Bersatu and Reformasi is mutually exclusive is incorrect to begin with, because underlying that assumption is that Harapan chairperson and former premier Dr Mahathir Mohamad will not change, and coalition partners in Harapan versus Bersatu are as weak as coalition partners in BN versus Umno.

No one at 92 who has stepped down at the height of power wants to come back unless the nation is in a really bad shape.

Yes, sure, he may want to help his son, so let's ask - during Mukhriz Mahathir's days as Kedah menteri besar, was he embroiled in any scandal? He's basically a good kid, right?

Then, do you think PKR, DAP and Amanah are going to sit quietly while Bersatu bulldozes through their policies? I don't think so. Over their dead bodies.

You will be a lot more helpful if you mobilise a team and go to the rural areas to campaign.

VGV: How many Harapan supporters are willing to take to the streets? It's not like the Hindraf or Bersih rallies held earlier, where thousands thronged the streets.

Now it's election time. The "Umno-fed" group will be taking the opportunity to hold a counter-protest and create "trouble" and perhaps even resort to violence.

This would be definitely a great setback to Harapan. An untoward incident "may force" the prime minister to impose a state of emergency and the rest would be history.

As Malaysians, many are not matured enough to take to the streets, except for a handful.

The only alternative is to go to the rural areas and try to break the people's confidence in BN. Explain the reality and it may work to a certain level.

If not, the contented lot will follow the wolf blindly.

Hank Marvin: Let us be smart and tactical just like social activist Hishamuddin Rais. He keeps things that are controversial to himself and continues to work with others, whatever the shortcomings.

Myviews: Jason, why pick on Harapan to vent your frustration? Why not pick on BN? If you're truly anti-establishment, help strengthen rather than criticise Harapan.

Everyone can see BN is doing everything possible to block Harapan from advancing: from the point of blocking its registration to making new laws so that anyone not in agreement with BN is punished.

If one looks around, we find that the ultimate weapon in those countries who have been under siege by their government is that the people revolt (with ugly consequences - hopefully not here) and the government is ultimately replaced. Will we be going along that path?

Robbed!!: Jason, I admire your passion and wanting to push for change aggressively.

We would love to do this. However, we are not in Australia or in another matured democracy. It is an uneven playing field, and the odds are against us.

We have to be very careful as any irrational decision can give BN the upper hand. The best contribution from you, Jason, is to mobilise those in Australia to vote from there or come here to vote.

'Umno mentality' posing a challenge to Bersatu

Existential Turd: Bersatu continues to operate like Umno, their members continue to expect to benefit from largess like Umno, their leaders continue to demand unquestioning loyalty like Umno.

Bersatu quacks and walks like Umno. The only thing they are unlike Umno in is their lack of access to government (i.e. taxpayers') resources.

Those disgruntled members are ripe for party-hopping after the 14th general election. Should they win on Harapan’s ticket with BN retaining a slim majority, I would not be surprised if there is a massive exodus from Bersatu to Umno.

Should Harapan win the next general election with a simple majority, those same Bersatu members will threaten to defect unless given the same largess as before. We will effectively revert back to BN’s modus operandi either way.

Harapan supporters, be careful what you wish for. Blind support for Harapan is as detrimental to the country as blind support for BN.

Anonymous: One question that has to be asked to all intending members of Harapan is whether they are joining to enrich themselves or to serve the rakyat.

The answer to this question must be held as the reason to expel them if they are found to be corrupt.

Anonymous 788831449650206: In Blackpool, England, when the Conservative party has its delegate meetings, every member pays for his or her own coffee and fish and chips.

Bersatu members must remember that they are different from Umno. If they do not, they will die like Umno.

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