By 52-Year-Old Malaysian

What the Chinese, and other M'sians want

People of Utusan Malaysia, read this. ‘Apa Lagi Cina Mahu’ is perhaps a true reflection of your mindset and intellect. So if you need to pose this question, screamingly loud on your front page, let me tell you now, clearly and calmly. And this also applies to you, O great leaders in the government.

This is what we, Malaysians, want:

Security: 

We do not want to fear walking in our streets. All too often, many of us are subject to snatch thieves, rapists and murderers. From school children, to working people and even the elderly, Malaysians fear for our lives. Even at times, staying in our own homes, we have intruders breaking in, at any time of day. Are the police and our home minister doing anything about this? Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Education:

Our graduates from Malaysian universities do not have the right skills to compete. Even basic communication skills are so obviously lacking. Listen. Listen. Listen. The overbearing, politically driven curriculum only serves to strengthen the argument of Dr Mahathir Mohamad who says Malaysians do not have the intellect to appreciate a public debate.

The rich and privileged send their children to private schools and overseas education.  Normal Malaysians have no choice but attend primary and secondary schools that have education levels that have eroded over the last 30 years. Nothing has been done to improve it, only words of action to review. Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Transportation:

Many of us rely on public transportation. To get to work on time by 9am, many are forced to get up as early as 5.30am to catch the unreliable bus or train. If it rains, you can bet we will never reach our office in time, or returning to work really late in the evening. In the rural areas or smaller towns, if one does not own a car, then it gets even worse.

There is no public transportation improvement policy – the ongoing mass rapid train system project in Kuala Lumpur has reached levels of costs that are incomprehensible to industry professionals. Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Eradication of poverty:

The NEP concept has never been an issue to many Malaysians. It’s the implementation of it that is highly questionable. After decades of being in existence, why are there still so many poor still in our very midst?

The Malays, who are supposed to be the prime beneficiaries still have thousands, if not millions who have yet to be self-reliant and have a decent meal, good education, housing and access to efficient medical facilities. The other races, who do not have the same NEP privileges, what of them? Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Meritocracy:

While most Malaysians who are non-bumiputera tend to accept that senior positions in all government bodies, even in sports associations are not considered for them, even our most brilliant achievers do not have consideration when it comes to scholarships or places in local higher education institutions.

I am not even talking about selection of national or state sports teams yet. I am not surprised that our best and brightest have moved on to other countries who accept their talents with open arms. How do we contribute to nation building if talent is cast aside in favour of political agenda? Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Proper use of public funds:

Housing, infrastructure, security, transportation, education and other essential facilities for Malaysians to have a better lifestyle has been compromised due to leakages within the system. It is no surprise that we have equipment that cannot be used, lack of trains and buses, traffic grid-locks, substandard education and so on.

If the funds allocated for such are not used entirely for its intended purpose, with large sums lining the pockets of the powers-that-be and their lackeys, shame on you for allowing this to continue so blatantly. Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Unbiased mainstream media:

And this is aimed directly at you Utusan Malaysia. Malaysians now have various platforms of information. No, we don’t believe everything we read on the Internet, but we sure trust this source more than we do the controlled mainstream media.

Your prejudiced views, unfair reporting and blatant negative opinions on all things contrary to government aspirations serve to position the noble profession of journalism of television, radio and newspapers as prostitutes to the powerful. Constructive criticism is regarded as threats to security, peaceful demonstrations are reported as acts of treason and public nuisance. When will Malaysia have a fair and unbiased media? Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

Harmony and stability:

Lastly, and by no means least. My best friends are bumiputeras and Indians. My school football team had a combination of all three races and we played our hearts out for the team and each other. We laughed together when we played well, we cried together when we lost. This was not only evident in our football team, this was very much part of our school credo. There were no shouts of derogatory racial slurs, we lived in a fabric of multi-cultural traditions and respect.

We now understand some quarters in the government (and past government) who still require a nation divided along racial lines to hold on to power and position. Rational Malaysians, and there are more than 53 percent of us in the country who reject this wholeheartedly.

Begone you devils of destruction, for you have no soul, only greed, lust and vanity. We desire a harmonious country, as Malaysians first, to love and respect others of different religions, colour and creed. Do we want a change for the better? Of course we do.

List goes on...

So people of Utusan, and our minority government leaders, I hope you know what we want. There is a longer list, but for now I think this will suffice as I am not entirely sure you can comprehend this simple message.

To other bigots and evil-minded politicians, change, change! This is a different Malaysia. This is a more enlightened Malaysia. A Malaysia that is wise to your ways. Wise to your destructive methods.

Hiduplah Malaysia. Hiduplah Malaysians.