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By Nigel Aw

Ex-IGP Rahim Noor warns of 'human rights wave'

Former inspector-general of police Abdul Rahim Mohd Noor today said the coming of a "human rights wave" would threaten the principles on which the country was founded.

Describing the wave as a new religion, he said it would threaten and erode the agreements among the different various races which were stitched at independence.

abdul rahim noor perkasa 2nd agm"If I subscribe to this religion, then I would question why I cannot be a royalty, what more if it concerns the status of the bumiputera?"

Rahim made the comments at a rare public appearance since serving a two-month prison sentence 10 years ago for beating up former deputy prime minister Anwar Ibrahim, who is now opposition leader.

The former police chief gave a keynote speech at the 2nd Perkasa Annual General Assembly in Kuala Lumpur this morning where he called on the Malays to be united against this ‘human rights wave’.

"I say this not as a Perkasa member - you can check the members’ numbers, I'm not part of the organisation, nor am I an Umno member."

This new wave, he said, was similar to the “communist wave” that hit our shores in 1930s and 1940s which was dominated by the Chinese.

Rahim said the communists had attempted to form an "enterprise" with Malay leftists to form a People's Republic of Malaya.

‘Malay leftists were communist stooges’

Taking PAS deputy president Mohamad Sabu to task for suggesting that nationalist Mohamed Indera was a freedom fighter, he said the Malay left such as the Parti Kebangsaan Melayu Malaya (PKMM) was a puppet of the Chinese-dominated Communist Party of Malaya (CPM).

"The PKMM was funded by CPM... When the CPM first set up its headquarters in Ipoh, PKMM also set its headquarters there and when the CPM moved to Kuala Lumpur, PKMM was also ordered to set its office here."

He added that during the Japanese surrender, the Bintang Tiga and All-Malayan People's Anti-Japanese Army (MPAJA) had murdered Malays on a scale greater than the May 13 riots.

This and the Malayan Union, he said, made Malays realised that they could not allow the Chinese-dominated CPM to come to power.

"It is under such an environment that Umno was formed to unite the Malays," he said.

Rahim, who oversaw the communist surrender as Special Branch chief, urged Malays to be cohesive in face of this "human rights wave" as they were during the “communist” wave.