Malaysiakini Letter

Prosecute all enforcement officers that break the law

Charles Hector
Published:

LETTER | Madpet (Malaysians Against Death Penalty and Torture) is concerned that the attorney-general found that there is insufficient evidence "…to warrant a culpable homicide investigation into Teoh Beng Hock's death …" What needs to be done is to continue the investigations.

The Teoh Beng Hock case also raises many other possible offences that could be prosecuted including the giving false statements, possibly also suppression or doctoring of evidence and other breaches of the law. Any enforcement officer who breaks the law should be investigated and prosecuted in an open court.

On July 16, 2009, Teoh was found dead on the fifth floor of Plaza Masalam, Shah Alam, after going to the MACC office on the 14th floor of the same building where he was interrogated. Teoh was brought into MACC Selangor’s office for questioning at 6 pm on July 15, 2009, where he remained for 19 hours until his body was found at 1.30 pm the next day.

Thai forensic pathologist Dr Pornthip Rojanasunand testified that she was 80 percent sure Teoh had been strangled before falling off the building. This was based on bruises on his neck.

The royal commission of inquiry also concluded that five MACC officers had given false testimonies about their actions before Teoh was found dead. They were then-MACC Selangor deputy director Hishamuddin Hashim and officers Mohd Ashraf Mohd Yunus, Bulkini Paharuddin, "Anuar" and "Raymond".

Both the commission's report and Court of Appeal judgments clearly stated that the MACC officers had committed wrongdoings when questioning Teoh, yet none have faced prosecution.

There are also many other deaths in custody cases like the case of Syed Mohd Azlan Syed Mohamed Nur where it was found that police officers or enforcement officers had broken the law.

In the Syed Mohd Azlan’s case, the Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) was reported as saying, “There was an element of crime in the attacks involving common intent or abetment by PDRM officers, including the arresting team, to intentionally use physical violence on the deceased to cause death or injury,” 

It said that the action was a criminal offence, specifically under Section 302 and 325 of the Penal Code read with Section 34 of the same Act. The EAIC’s investigations also found attempts to obscure evidence by police officers.

Sadly, we have not heard that all these officers were charged and tried in court.

Now, we have a new government and a new attorney-general and Madpet prays that all these officers who committed crimes, including doctoring, fabricating and hiding evidence should be investigated and prosecuted. Those who make false statements should also be prosecuted.

The perception of the administration of justice in Malaysia suffers when police, MACC or other enforcement officers seem to be able to escape prosecution and trial. Internal disciplinary measures, including termination, alone are totally inadequate.

Public officers with the responsibility of enforcing the law must never break the law, and if they do, they must be immediately prosecuted and tried in court and if found guilty, their sentence best be a deterrent sentence.

Such open trials may result in ensuring that other enforcement officers will in the future obey the law for fear of being prosecuted if the break it in any way, be it for corruption, torture or any other crime.

Therefore, Madpet,

  • Calls on the attorney-general to immediately investigate, charge and try in an open court all enforcement officers that have broken any law whatsoever, not just those that caused the death of Teoh Beng Hock, Syed Mohd Azlan and others who have died in custody and other victims;

  • Calls on the attorney-general to look at all Suhakam, EAIC and the royal commissions of inquiry reports and immediately take action against the police, MACC or other enforcement officers that have been found to have committed crimes;

  • Calls on the Malaysian government to adopt a strict policy of prosecuting any breach of law committed by public servants and not simply resort to internal disciplinary measures including termination;

  • Calls on the media to actively report and highlight all cases involving wrongdoings of public servants, especially enforcement officers, as this will help reduce corruption and criminal activities in the police, MACC, Immigration Department and the civil service generally;

  • Calls on the Malaysian government to enact laws that make it a crime for public servants who know of criminal wrongdoings of their fellow public servants and fail to come forward or cover-up evidence of these wrongdoings; and

  • Calls on the Malaysian government to restore public confidence in the police, MACC, enforcement officers, civil servants and especially in the administration of justice in Malaysia.


The views expressed here are those of the author/contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of Malaysiakini.

Related Reports

Share this story

OR

Welcome back,

Your subscription expires on
  

Your subscription will expire soon, kindly renew before
  

Your subscription is expired
  Click here to renew

You are not subscribed to any subscription package
  Click here to subscribe now

Any questions?
  Email: [email protected]
  Call: +603-777-00000

Renew