Meet the Mah Meri women breaking Orang Asli stereotypes

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MALAYSIANS KINI At first glance, Diana looks just like any other regular Malay woman. She has straight black hair, a light tan which Malays would describe as 'kuning langsat' (olive skin), and speaks without any accent.

She also has a degree in administration from Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Malacca, and works as a clerk at Serdang Hospital.

However, despite appearances and educational background, she is not a Malay, though many of her accquaintances initially think otherwise.

The 29-year-old whose full name is Diana Uju, is a member of the Mah Meri Orang Asli community from Pulau Carey, Selangor.

“My colleagues at work tell me 'I never imagined you to be an Orang Asli, I'm proud to be friends with one'.

“I ask them why, and they tell me 'you don't look like an Orang Asli',” Diana said with a laugh.

The mother of two is one of several Mah Meri women Malaysiakini met during a trip to Pulau Carey recently.

Though shy at first - as many people are when they first encounter a journalist - Diana quickly warmed up to share her views and life experiences.

She said many Malaysians look down on members of the community, and have stereotypical views of them.

“People think the Orang Asli have curly hair, are dark-skinned, live in the forest, and don’t know anything, that’s why they think we can’t succeed.

“They have never met an educated Orang Asli, although there are many of us,” she said.

Diana's success however, is uncommon in the community.

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