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Yoursay: Rehab ‘basikal lajak’ kids, but don’t forget to discipline them, too

Yoursay

Published
Modified 13 Nov 2019, 4:54 am

YOURSAY | Basikal lajak, or mosquito bicycle, is akin to the Mat Rempit nuisance.

Basikal lajak' riders need guidance, not punishment: Syed Saddiq

Nemo Big: Minister of Youth and Sports Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman, it seems like you have a knack for messing up on many issues and this is no exception.

Instead of reprimanding the parents who failed to take care of their own kids and allowing them to be out on modified bikes at 3am, you still want to defend the "basikal lajak” community?

Syed Saddiq, as a matter of fact, the police had already warned that they are mulling action under the Child Act against parents whose children are caught using modified bicycles.

On Nov 4, Bukit Aman investigation and traffic enforcement director Azisman Alias said apart from action under existing traffic law, legal action could be used against parents or guardians who failed in their responsibility to ensure those under their watch are not involved in modified bicycle activities.

Shame on you, minister. Instead of coming up with some plan or activity to occupy these kids in a wholesome way, you are trying to defend a “community” that is doing something wrong in the first place.

Kafir Latte: Remember when Khairy Jamaluddin was Umno Youth chief, he was behind the idiotic idea of turning “Mat Rempit” into "Mat Cemerlang" by spending taxes to build race tracks for them and train them to do motorcycle stunts for amusements.

This is the same thing.

And of course, the handing out of contracts for events, uniforms, bicycles, programmes, broadcasting rights, etc, and naturally the resulting kickbacks.

For your information, minister, these ‘basikal lajak’ have no lights, no brakes, and have handlebars, wheel forks and seats modified in order for the rider to assume the “Superman” position easily.

Anonymous 2376651444483260: I saw them in my neurosurgery ward. They had an accident and needed to remove blood clots from their brains.

It cost the government at least RM20,000 for utilising the operation theatre and Intensive Care Unit. But hey, continue encouraging them, Syed Saddiq.

Things would quieten down for a while, but in a few months, the same children would be back on the roads, highways and speeding up and down the hills again.

Ian2003: It is not wrong to rehabilitate these children but at the same time the minister should not neglect efforts to discipline them.

If they are not taught to follow the law at a young age, what would they become when they grow up and disregard the law?

This should be the focus.

Just A Malaysian: Young kids playing truant and mischief must be disciplined. They must be aware of what is wrong and right.

Trying to mollycoddle a bad behaviour is tantamount to sending a wrong signal. Syed Saddiq got his thinking bordering on naiveness.

Since January this year, the Bukit Aman investigation and traffic enforcement unit launched a total of 13 operations nationwide and nabbed 116 cyclists. Those nabbed were students and below 18 years old.

Syed Saddiq, don’t you think this is a serious problem?

Falcon: The real issue here is the obvious lack or neglect of parenting responsibility. This is a systemic problem which shows its head at several social and criminal issues and ills nationwide.

This has to be addressed sooner, rather than later, and not be sidelined. Lives have been lost due to this worthless activity.

In fact, the police have said that individuals engaged in dangerous cycling, including actions which put the lives of other road users at risk, face action under the Road Traffic Rules 1959, which carries a maximum fine of RM2,000.

If the offenders are underage, their parents could face action under Section 31 of the Child Act 2001 for neglect of children, with a maximum punishment of 10 years' jail and RM20,000 fine.

I suggest that the minister works hand in hand with the police on how to solve this social ill which will become worse if it is not nipped in the bud.

Mazilamani: Is ‘basikal lajak’ a recognised sports activity in other countries? Please name them.

Who are those engaging in such a sport? Have their backgrounds been checked? Is anyone taking interest to find out if parents realise the risky sport that their children are engaging in?

If the ministry is not interested in creating proper circuits around the country, is the minister suggesting they continue using the busy roads?

Is the minister going to be responsible for the maiming injuries, including deaths? Can parents sue the minister for encouraging the sport?

Think. We are making the same mistake as with the Mat Rempits in the past. The situation has only got worse.

Weijian: Train them to represent Malaysia as national cyclists?

Are you kidding me? An athlete is not just about the sport itself but more importantly, the discipline and hard work that one has put in to excel in a particular field.

I am not looking down on these boys but it seems like you, the youth and sports minister of all people, have underestimated what it takes to represent the country as an athlete.

Headhunter: Two wrongs don't make a right. Instead of helping to eliminate this social menace, this minister wants to compound it.

Maybe he should ask the authorities to provide a special "lajak" lane on all major highways for them to race.

XED: Anything to win votes, I would say. How many politicians have the courage to rebuke people for their irresponsible and illegal behaviour?

The boys (and their parents) caused the horrific accident and it led to a lot of disruption, chaos, delays and economic loss and hardship, including to themselves and others.

Anonymous_3925G: Mr Minister, these children have parents. What are they doing?


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