NEWS

'Brickfields OCPD lost control'

Published
Modified 22 May 2009, 6:32 am

your say ‘This OCPD had clearly lost control of himself. Please tell me otherwise after viewing the video. it is a disgrace to the Malaysian police force and to the government of Malaysia.'

On Brickfields police chief an embarrassing disgrace

Frankly Xroy: It is really difficult to come to terms with the behaviour of the OCPD of Brickfields. I have seen gangsters behaving better, I have.

He was filmed yelling at a small group who were holding a candlelight vigil, a very peaceful vigil. There was no obstruction as it was just a show of concern.

This OCPD had clearly lost control of himself. Please tell me otherwise after viewing the video. it is a disgrace to the Malaysian police force and to the government of Malaysia.

Mr Prime Minister, I really do not know how you can hold your head up high and walk in international circles with such behaviour by your police force in public.

And you sit there doing nothing except to remain in self-denial and blame others for your actions.

The arrest of the lawyers who had come to the police station to see their clients was aimed at intimidating the lawyers who were there to do their job.

I hope this video is sent to all the papers and media around the world.

Will Mahathir and Muhyuddin now say the international press are trying to undermine the government and PM Najib in particular?

Jeffrey: When I saw the video of the attitude of the Brickfields police chief speaking through a loudspeaker and threatening the public over a peaceful gathering, it reminded me of the movie ‘The Killing Fields'.

We must not allow police officers like these to be on the field as they do not have the civic consciousness and human relationship skills needed in this modernised world.

We need people with good leadership and who are considerate to allow the public to hold peaceful gatherings.

As far as I see, the Brickfields OCPD should be given more training and not go around threatening the public.

If he do not understand the law, than he should be taken out from the payroll.

The public pays their tax money for the police to protect them and not to be arrested unlawfully without access to counsel.

On 'Hisham, explain abuse of police powers'

Harbans Kaur: What is happening to the A Kugan case? Why is this alone taking them so long to investigate and charge the perpetrators?

I think the Bar Council is spot on in asking both the IGP and the Home Minister to resign.

Take a cue from the British house speaker.

On 'I'm sorry for what my son did'

Ong: I don't believe the police officer was actually interested in getting money from RPK.

More likely he was trying to set a trap and hoping to arrest RPK for attempting to bribe a police officer.

If successful, the monetary reward would have been a great deal bigger.

John Johnson: It is indeed heartbreaking to see what has happened. These are really trying times for RPK's family.

The parents are torn between emotions as they ponder the fate of their son. But let's look at the scenario - he chose a life for himself.

We all must pay for our sins. This is only right.

I also read that an Egyptian tycoon was sentenced to death for hiring someone to kill his wife. Well, good for nobody is above the law,

Some of our ministers and councillors are tainted so badly but they are not investigated. Is this justice?

To RPK and his family, we are sincerely sorry and we empathise with you and your wife.

Indeed, it takes a lot of courage, strength and integrity to walk the talk but God will show you the way and we Malaysians are proud of you.

Hopefully your son will learn from this and come out a better person.

And what did the police say? They said it is a small problem and can be settled monetary- wise. What has the IGP got to say about this?

Ask for his resignation immediately.

On No drama at Seri Kembangan vigil

David Yoong:

Instead of just holding vigils, where participants are subjected to harassment and even arrests by the brutal and unjust police, why don't the supporters of Perakian democracy do this.

Work a twist to the Mid-Autumn Festival folk tale of the Chinese uprising against Mongol rule during the Yuan Dynasty.

Instead of a small piece of paper inserted into a mooncake, get all the supporting households all over Perak to put up a large piece of paper (like a poster, or a banner for those who can afford it) in front of their houses.

Write messages on them, voicing their desires for a dissolution of the state assembly and for fresh elections.

The posters or banners may be mounted on the front gate (if waterproofed), or the front doors, or on the upstairs window for visibility.

For those who do not mind adding some emphatic highlights, they may drape the poster/banner with a black cloth, complete with a burning candle.