Malaysiakini News

If we can't protect your data, then we don't deserve to serve you

Mark Zuckerberg  |  Published:  |  Modified:

COMMENT | I want to share an update on the Cambridge Analytica situation – including the steps we've already taken and our next steps to address this important issue.

We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you. I've been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn't happen again.

The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there's more to do, and we need to step up and do it.

Here's a timeline of the events:

In 2007, we launched the Facebook platform with the vision that more apps should be social. Your calendar should be able to show your friends’ birthdays, your maps should show where your friends live, and your address book should show their pictures. To do this, we enabled people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

In 2013, a Cambridge University researcher named Aleksandr Kogan created a personality quiz app. It was installed by around 300,000 people who shared their data as well as some of their friends' data. Given the way our platform worked at the time this meant Kogan was able to access tens of millions of their friends' data.

In 2014, to prevent abusive apps, we announced that we were changing the entire platform to dramatically limit the data apps could access. Most importantly, apps like Kogan's could no longer ask for data about a person's friends unless their friends had also authorised the app.

We also required developers to get approval from us before they could request any sensitive data from people. These actions would prevent any app like Kogan's from being able to access so much data today.

In 2015, we learned from journalists at The Guardian that Kogan had shared data from his app with Cambridge Analytica. It is against our policies for developers to share data without people's consent, so we immediately banned Kogan's app from our platform, and demanded that Kogan and Cambridge Analytica formally certify that they had deleted all improperly acquired data. They provided these certifications.


Read more: Zuckerberg says FB made mistakes on user data, vows curbs


Last week, we learned from The Guardian, The New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified. We immediately banned them from using any of our services.

Cambridge Analytica claims they have already deleted the data and has agreed to a forensic audit by a firm we hired to confirm this. We're also working with regulators as they investigate what happened.

This was a breach of trust between Kogan, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. But it was also a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that.

In this case, we already took the most important steps a few years ago in 2014 to prevent bad actors from accessing people's information in this way. But there's more we need to do and I'll outline those steps here:

First, we will investigate all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform to dramatically reduce data access in 2014, and we will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity.

We will ban any developer from our platform that does not agree to a thorough audit. And if we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them and tell everyone affected by those apps. That includes people whose data Kogan misused here as well.

Second, we will restrict developers' data access even further to prevent other kinds of abuse. For example, we will remove developers' access to your data if you haven't used their app in three months.

We will reduce the data you give an app when you sign in -- to only your name, profile photo, and email address. We'll require developers to not only get approval but also sign a contract in order to ask anyone for access to their posts or other private data. And we'll have more changes to share in the next few days.

Third, we want to make sure you understand which apps you've allowed to access your data. In the next month, we will show everyone a tool at the top of your News Feed with the apps you've used and an easy way to revoke those apps' permissions to your data. We already have a tool to do this in your privacy settings, and now we will put this tool at the top of your News Feed to make sure everyone sees it.

Beyond the steps we had already taken in 2014, I believe these are the next steps we must take to continue to secure our platform.

I started Facebook, and at the end of the day I'm responsible for what happens on our platform. I'm serious about doing what it takes to protect our community. While this specific issue involving Cambridge Analytica should no longer happen with new apps today, that doesn't change what happened in the past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.

I want to thank all of you who continue to believe in our mission and work to build this community together. I know it takes longer to fix all these issues than we'd like, but I promise you we'll work through this and build a better service over the long term.


MARK ZUCKERBERG is the CEO of Facebook.

This content first appeared as a status update on Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook page.  

The views expressed here are those of the author/contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of Malaysiakini.


READ MORE
Bersatu mulls legal action against PMO, Cambridge Analytica
Cambridge Analytica tight-lipped on GE14 engagements
Mukhriz and ex-aide accuse each other of lying over Cambridge Analytica
Mukhriz slams 'misleading' PMO, says diverting from 'illegal tactics'
PMO claims Cambridge Analytica reported directly to Mukhriz
Granny’s blood pressure rises due to CA controversy
Harapan MPs: BN-CA link reeks of ‘foreign interference’
Cambridge Analytica - Muhyiddin in the dark, says Najib does things on his own
Mukhriz pleads ignorance on Cambridge Analytica’s role in Kedah
Did you manipulate GE13, Bersatu’s Wan Saiful asks Najib
‘Sex, lies and bribes’ - Trump’s election consultants admit to working in M’sia
Zuckerberg says FB made mistakes on user data, vows curbs
The links between Cambridge Analytica, Brexit campaign group
Cambridge Analytica denies entrapping, says ‘grossly misrepresented’
Suspended Cambridge Analytica boss boasts of influencing US polls
Facebook hires independent auditors to probe alleged data breach
UK authorities seek warrant to search Cambridge Analytica offices
Factbox: What is Cambridge Analytica and what did it do?

 

Sign in


Welcome back,

Your subscription expires on
  

Your subscription will expire soon, kindly renew before
  

Your subscription is expired
  Click here to renew

You are not subscribed to any subscription package
  Click here to subscribe now

Any questions?
  Email: [email protected]
  Call: +603-777-00000

Renew